Getting Marked as a SPAM? See how we avoid it

May 10, 2016 - 4 minutes read

The real origin of the term comes from a 1970 Monty Python’s Flying Circus skit.  In this skit, all the restaurant’s menu items devolve into SPAM.  When the waitress repeats the word SPAM, a group of Vikings in the corner sing “SPAM, SPAM, SPAM, SPAM, SPAM, SPAM, SPAM, SPAM, lovely SPAM!  Wonderful SPAM!”, drowning out other conversation, until they are finally told to shut it.

Sending an email is not a guarantee that it will arrive at it’s destinatary’s inbox. A good part of them are going right to the SPAM folder. In the case of American’s businesses emails, this rate is about 25%.

That means one out four emails your craft and send are being wasted.

Down below you will see some common reasons that might be causing automatic SPAM filters to catch your emails:

#1. Blacklisted 😥 words in Subject Lines 👈😯

If you do not have the recipient’s email as a contact, words like “free”, “offer” and “money” might trigger the alarm for the SPAM filters. Check this full list with 200 words that might be triggering the alarm.

become email spammer

 

#2. Email full of CAPS and exclamation points!!!!!

HEY! CHECK THIS AWESOME OFFER WE HAVE EXCLUSIVELY FOR YOU!!!! YOU WON’T BE ABLE TO REFUSE AFTER SEEING THIS!!!!!!!!!!

And you are out…

become email spammer

Here’s how an email that’s fallen victim to an spam filter shows up in the dark depths of a recipient’s spam folder:

Screen Shot 2016-05-09 at 21.04.43

 

#3.  📎 Attachments 📎

It’s ok to send attachments to people you already know and have conversation threads with. Though sending it in a cold email might leave you out of your recipient’s inbox. Take a look at this principle to understand why these kinds of things are considered a harm by SPAM filters.

Screen Shot 2016-05-09 at 21.30.44

 

#4. Email with various different and colored fonts 

Do not make a carnival (🇧🇷 🎉) with your email text. Do it right and simple so you might not be considered as a SPAM.

Screen Shot 2016-05-09 at 21.57.32

 

#5. Image to text ratio is too high ⤴️🎈

Do not make an email full of graphics and images. It’s important to put more text in order to not get caught up by an automatic SPAM filter.

Check Salesforce research about this.

Their findings:

  • Emails less than 500 characters should contain a supporting image
  • Emails over 500 characters are not significantly impacted by image/text ratio restrictions

 

“To give you an idea of what a 500-character email would look like, this message is exactly 500 characters (with spaces).

 

Emails of this length are typically 5 to 7 sentences long. They give you enough room to introduce yourself, describe why you’re reaching out plus what value you offer, and then request something. Just like that.

 

Because sales emails today are kept short in order to draw a prospect’s attention, keep it, and quickly drive action, they often fall within this 500-character range.”

 

That are also the cases when the recipient marks you as a spam. Avoid misleading and deceptive subject lines. Don’t frustrate the experience of opening up your emails. If you do so, you will be probably marked as a SPAM and will throw some dust on your company name.

Try to follow these tips and you will be good. At least you will drop your chances to be marked as a SPAM. 😎

Quick question:  Do you know another reason that emails get caught in spam filters or marked as spam by your recipients?

Summary
Review Date
Reviewed Item
Getting Marked as a SPAM? See how we avoid it
Author Rating
5

Comments

comments

Tags: , , ,